This Week in Interior Design: 09 February 2015

The latest, most happening, up-to-date news in interior design, art, architecture, real estate, and everything in between

Updated on June 06, 2017 10:06 am

Camille Besinga

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Missed Cromly Design Village Last Month? You Can STILL Win Big!

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If, for some reason, you weren’t able to make it to our very first Cromly Design Village last month, don’t fret. You can still win big by signing up with any of the interior designers that participated in our event. If you’re able to close a renovation contract with any of them within this year, you get a chance to win $25,000 or $15,000! The best part? Last day of submission is on 31 December 2015 (yes, you read that right: up to the last day of this year!), which gives you more time to get a reno package with any of our participating designers. Grand draw is on 4 January 2016.

Seattle Townhouses Facilitate Neighbourly Interaction, Mitigates Visual Impact of Residents’ Parking Spaces

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Many homes in urban areas are often made in such a way that lessens community participation. Apart from the lack of space to interact with neighbours and entertain guests, townhouses often have blah-looking parking spaces that ruin the property’s sightline. Neiman Taber Architects set out to address these issues when they designed the recently erected Marion Green Courtyard Townhomes in Seattle, Washington. This new housing type has a centrally located courtyard that all residents may share and act as a place where they’re “forced” to interact with each other, as it serves as the primary circulation route. Each unit will still have semi-private deck spaces, while public, semiprivate, and private amenities are layered and nested within the property so that residents may be able to find a balance between privacy and community.

Another feature of the Courtyard Townhomes is that parking is situated under the courtyard deck, mitigating the problem of the parking space’s visual impact. This way, the site normally reserved for parking is returned to open space. According to Architizer.com, Marion Green “is a model for how urban neighbourhoods can grow successfully, satisfying pragmatic concerns like parking and project economics while providing an architectural solution that is people-centred and humane.”

You’ll Never Guess What These Furnishings Are Made Out Of!

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Every now and then we stumble upon discoveries on the WWW about new designs and products that really boggle the mind and push the envelope. This new collection from design student Matilde Beckman is one of them. What looks like furniture seemingly made out of black marble are really—are you sitting down? If not, now’s about time you did—made of dust.

Yup, you read that right. Dust. Now how is this possible? Beckman used dust collected from the floors of vintage clothes shops to form this collection cheekily called, “How Dust This Feel?” They are made in specially designed moulds from a composite of the dust in the vacuum cleaner bags from secondhand clothing stores, wood glue, water, and which are all mixed by hand. High-gloss varnish is then applied to the top surface to make them look like black marble. 

“I wanted to question the hierarchy of materials,” says the designer in an interview with Dezeen. “Dust is a waste product without value. It’s really gross; it contains human skin cells and other waste products from our environment. I have put it into a new context to give it a higher value, so it will be seen from a new perspective. Since dust is something we usually have in corners, I wanted to display and refine it and gave it a monumental look that dares to be seen.” 

Click here to find out how Beckman was able to bind dust into a sturdy piece of furniture worthy of a spot in a contemporary home.

Working From Home? Take Design Cues From This Guy

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As a property developer and former real estate agent, Amsterdam-based Frank Nederhof knows property gem when he sees one. And seeing this over-a-century-old fixer-upper near Amsterdam’s Vondelpark made his professional instincts go “ding! ding! ding!” 

Dating from the 1880s and hasn’t been renovated since the 1970s, the edifice had high ceilings and was about three feet wider than most 19th-century houses. However, the structure was outmoded, and needed to be renovated. 

Nederhof completely renovated it and divided the property into several apartments to sell and rent. But not without reserving a live-work space for himself in a 1,350-square-foot space, of course. To separate his work area from his living areas, Nederhof used glass doors, but made sure that the office will still be accessible to both the hallway and the bathroom. “As a real estate agent, I’m always aware that homes will have to sell,” he tells Dwell. "So [the office] is a very versatile space. I use it for work, but it could be used as another bedroom.” 

Find out more about how Nederhof refurbished the space here.


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